Glen Park Crime Report, July 1 – July 31, 2015

Wednesday, July 1st, 2015
7:00pm 500 Blk Chenery Vandalism

Thursday, July 2nd, 2015
6:00pm 100 Blk Acadia Personation

Friday, July 3rd, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Saturday, July 4th, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Sunday, July 5th, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Monday, July 6th, 2015
10:00pm Unit Blk Chenery Stolen Vehicle

Tuesday, July 7th, 2015
8:29pm Diamond/Bosworth Traffic Collision

Wednesday, July 8th, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Thursday, July 9th, 2015
02:00pm 500 Blk Laidley Stay Away Order Violation
08:30pm Unit Blk Malta Stolen Vehicle
09:00pm 300 Blk Arlington Stolen Vehicle

Friday, July 10th, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Saturday, July 11th, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Sunday, July 12th, 2015
12:58pm San Jose/Rousseau Traffic Collision
04:53pm Chenery/Lippard Stolen Vehicle

Monday, July 13th, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Tuesday, July 14th, 2015
04:40am 100 Blk Lippard Recovered Vehicle

Wednesday, July 15th, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Thursday, July 16th, 2015
12:38pm Unit Blk Monterey Embezzlement
05:30pm 100 Blk Brompton Burglary
08:22pm San Jose/Rousseau Traffic Collision

Friday, July 17th, 2015
06:30pm Randall/Chenery Stolen License Plate

Saturday, July 18th, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Sunday, July 19th, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Monday, July 20th, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Tuesday, July 21st, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Thursday, July 23rd, 2015

2:06pm San Jose/Rousseau Drugs
Ingleside Officer Hackard was patrolling in an unmarked police vehicle
on Silver Avenue and Alemany when he stopped for a red light. When the
light turned green, and before he could proceed through the
intersection, a 2011 Honda CRV, driving northbound on Alemany, sped
through the red light at a high rate of speed. Officer Hackard began
following the vehicle and requested assistance. The suspects sped
north on Alemany, west on Geneva, north on #280 before exiting on San
Jose Avenue with Officer Hackard now joined by Ingleside Officers
Trail and Vong. The vehicle was stopped at San Jose and Rousseau. The
officers asked for license, registration, and insurance from the
driver and complied. The officers conducted a safety check of the
vehicle and found two backpacks belong to both occupants. The
backpacks contained a significant quantity of marijuana and a large
quantity of a prescription narcotic. The two were taken to Ingleside
Station and booked for a traffic violation and for possession of
narcotics for sale. Their vehicle was released to its owner. Report
number: 150640742

02:40am 100 Blk Laidley Stolen Vehicle
10:00pm Arlington/Mateo Theft from Vehicle

Friday, July 24th, 2015
09:15am 100 Blk Lippard Burglary
06:14pm 400 Blk Arlington Warrant Arrest
09:00pm Unit Blk Lyell Stolen Vehicle

Saturday, July 25th, 2015
03:00am Bosworth/Arlington Traffic Collision
06:22pm 500 Blk 30th Street Theft from Vehicle

Sunday, July 26th, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Monday, July 27th, 2015
07:16am 100 Blk Laidley Recovered Vehicle
01:03pm 200 Blk Congo Recovered Vehicle
03:00pm 2800 Blk Diamond Fraud
07:10pm Diamond Heights/Sussex Theft from Vehicle

Tuesday, July 28th, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Wednesday, July 29th, 2015

10:00am 2800 Blk Diamond Theft from ATM Machine
A victim walked to the Bank of America to deposit money at the ATM. As
he was walking away, he received a cellular notification that money
had just been withdrawn. He noticed a female suspect at the same ATM.
He immediately yelled at her and she began to flee. He called police
as he was chasing her down the street. Ingleside Officers Morrow and
Trujillo responded and made contact with the victim. While speaking to
the victim, officers spotted the suspect. She was detained without
incident. A cold show was then performed and the victim exclaimed
“Yes, That’s definitely her”. Officers searched her and found $600 all
in 20 dollar denominations. They also found a Bank of America ATM
receipt. She told the officers that she took the money to feed her
kids. The suspect was cited and released. Report Number: 150659141

08:05am Bosworth/Diamond Traffic Collision

Thursday, July 30th, 2015
Nothing to report from Glen Park.

Friday, July 31st, 2015

11:30pm 1200 Blk Bosworth Assault
A local resident who saw 12 subjects walking into Glen Canyon Park at
11:30 at night thought this was suspicious and decided to make an
anonymous call to police. Officers Scott and Hardy got the call and
went to check it out. Upon arrival, they made their way into the park
and, to their surprise, found 100 teenagers inside the park having a
party. As they approached, the large crowd began dispersing and
running away in all directions. The officers then heard a loud
commotion coming from the 1200 block of Bosworth and went to
investigate. As they continued to patrol the area they were flagged
down by an unknown subject who said he heard that someone in the crowd
had been stabbed. The officers conducted a search but couldn’t find
any victim(s). About 45 minutes later, the officers were notified that
a stabbing victim had walked into San Francisco General, who said he
had been stabbed near Glen Canyon Park. Officer Scott and Hardy went
to speak with the victim, who said as he was leaving the park with
some friends when they were confronted by another group of young men.
A fight broke out and at some point during the scuffle he said he
sustained several cuts to his left hand. The victim suffered two cuts,
one of them requiring 6 stitches and was considered to be in stable
condition. Several Ingleside units searched the Glen Canyon Park and
found a knife on the 1200 block of Bosworth Street. No surveillance
cameras were located. Report Number: 150667382

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Bird & Beckett jazz drummer Jimmy Ryan: 1939 – 2015

Jimmy and Rory Ryan at Bird & Beckett.

Jimmy and Rory Ryan at Bird & Beckett.

Story and photos by Murray Schneider

I didn’t know Jimmy Ryan all that well. I’d see him on the Fridays I dropped by Bird & Beckett, to catch his ensemble serving up bebop at the bookstore. On the second Friday of each month, Jimmy sat at the rear of Eric Whittington’s stage, leaning over his drums, usually wearing a T-shirt, a shock of white hair curving across his forehead.

On those evenings, the only time Jimmy looked happier than when his sticks supported the band’s beat was when his wife Rory walked in, usually near the end of the first set, and took a seat in the audience.

Jimmy left us suddenly this July, a victim of a heart attack and a big part of the Bird & Beckett community took a hit.

- Howie Dudune, JImmy Ryan, Don Prell, Scott Foster and Chuck Peterson at Bird & Beckett's 16th anniversary celebration of Jazz in the Bookstore -- May 22, 2015.

– Howie Dudune, JImmy Ryan, Don Prell, Scott Foster and Chuck Peterson at Bird & Beckett’s 16th anniversary celebration of Jazz in the Bookstore — May 22, 2015.

Bird & Beckett bookseller, Eric Whittington, wasn’t about to let Jimmy’s passing go unnoticed. On August 14, nearly 100 jazz fans crowded into his bookshop, listening as Jimmy’s Bird & Beckett BeBop Band paid tribute to its fallen leader. When they finished, they’d performed nearly three hours of jazz improvisations.

Whittington took the stage at 5:30 P.M. and stated a few simple facts. How Jimmy first began playing the bookstore venue in 2002 when jazz chanteuse Dorothy Lefkovits brought in a trio led by guitarist Henry Irvin. While at the gig, Jimmy noted a flyer advertising tenor player Chuck Peterson’s trio. Jimmy had known Chuck. They hooked up again, and the long-running “jazz in the bookshop” series was inaugurated.

Jeff Kaliss, reciting "Jimmy Ryan, Jimmy Ryan," a poem written by bebop piano player Don Alberts.

Jeff Kaliss, reciting “Jimmy Ryan, Jimmy Ryan,” a poem written by bebop piano player Don Alberts.

“This is Jimmy’s band,” said Whittington, pointing behind him to Stu Pilorz, Joe Cohen, Don Alberts, Ron Marabuto and Bishu Chatterjee. “This is Jimmy’s night.”

“Jimmy, on drums, drove and supported the band — and his experience in the music and the business ground them,” Whittington e-mailed me several days later. “He was trusted and respected and appreciated for his experience, his love of the music and for the respect he showed the other musicians of whatever generation.”

2015 marked sixteen years of jazz in the bookstore. Jimmy and Eric, inextricably bound by chords of jazz riffs, had celebrated together on May 22 when Jimmy fronted a quartet of players who’d all played with one another in the shop at one time or another.

Rory Ryan greeting a friend who offers her condolences at Jimmy's passing.

Rory Ryan greeting a friend who offers her condolences at Jimmy’s passing.

That was the last time I’d seen Jimmy. After he’d threaded his way between milling members of the audience during a set break, he served up his patented smile.

We shook hands. I’d written several pieces about him over the years, one about how he’d met Rory Donovan, a Sutter Health Care nurse, twelve years earlier when she’d dropped by the bookstore in April 2003. Eric’s bookshop was still on Diamond Street then, and Jimmy knew the moment he’d put his eyes on her she’d become his life’s partner.

They’d been inseparable ever since.

With Joel Ryan behind him, bookseller Eric Whittington introducing Jimmy Ryan's Bird & Beckett Bebop Band.

With Joel Ryan behind him, bookseller Eric Whittington introducing Jimmy Ryan’s Bird & Beckett Bebop Band.

Jimmy shared how he and Rory had recently returned from a Hawaii vacation, and how he’d a dicey minute or two while snorkeling. Finding himself pinned against several rocks, he’d only managed to extricate himself with some difficulty.

Then, only months later, while walking with Rory on the Fourth of July weekend he’d collapsed. Rory administered first aid while she waited for paramedics to arrive.

“Jimmy was very patriotic,” Rory told me later, “so this was always a special holiday for him. We’d gone to a Monterey Independence Day parade with friends, then to church and had lunch. Then Jimmy played his drums and then we went on our hike.”

Joel Ryan playing his horn on August 14.

Joel Ryan playing his horn on August 14.

Jimmy Ryan was born in Los Angeles in 1939 and raised there with his two sisters, Midge and Bonnie. At 13, a cousin introduced him to jazz, and he began playing drums at 18. Jimmy moved to San Francisco in the 1960s. With his first wife, Pat, he raised a family of six children. One of them, Joel, is an accomplished jazz trumpeter in his own right.

About the time Jimmy perfected his chops at clubs such as the Fillmore’s Jimbo’s Bop City and Ronnie’s Soulville and the Jazz Workshop in North Beach, I had began a teaching career, experiencing all the predictable doubts facing first-year instructors. To steel myself for each Monday morning, I’d tune into DJ Bobby Dale on Sunday evenings. Bobby programmed jazz luminaries such as Ruby Braff, Bucky Pizzarelli, Stephane Grappelli, Django Reinhardt, and Blossom Dearie, introducing each in an improv stream of consciousness worthy of James Joyce.

A half a decade before, while in college, I’d wander along Broadway. Turk Murphy’s and the El Matador were my destinations. Fantasy Records LPs, featuring, Dave Brubeck, Cal Tjader and Chet Baker continued to be a big part of my life for years afterward as I wrote my lesson plans.

Then, in 2006, just a fifteen-minute downhill walk from my house to Bird & Beckett I found Jimmy playing. It was like closing a circle.

With Rory sitting in the third row on August 14, after 30 minutes of music, after writer Jeff Kaliss recited “Jimmy Ryan, Jimmy Ryan,” a poem penned by piano player Don Alberts, bassist Bishu Chatterjee approached the mic.

“We’re very happy and very sad,” said Chatterjee, who’d been with Jimmy since the bookstore beginning. “Jimmy touched us all, connecting us to one another. I’ll miss my dear friend, his zest for life, his love of family and his passion for bebop drumming.”

Chatterjee cradled his bass, hugging it close. In a moment, he kicked off an original composition.

“I wrote this for Jimmy and call it “Indra’s Jewel Net” because I was impacted by Jimmy’s connection for life, both on the bandstand and off,” Chatterjee told the audience. “As the Hindu myth goes, if you touched one of Lord Indra’s jewels, it would reflect on others in the net. Jimmy touched so many people.”

Later, Joel Ryan stepped to the stage, phrasing soulful notes in his father’s memory. Afterward, sandwiched between stacks of used fiction titles, he reminisced.

“This was one of my dad’s favorite places,” he said. “My dad met Rory here, and he liked sharing it with as many people as he could, especially buying Bird & Beckett gift certificates for his grandkids.”

Don Alberts walked by, his fingers fresh from a stint on the piano.

“This bookstore,” he said, winking, “is just Eric’s left handed way of getting a jazz club.”

“Jimmy loved the scene here and was convinced that Bird & Beckett would go down in history as a key episode in the history of jazz in San Francisco,” agreed Whittington. “He knew that it was ongoing, barely started and yet already significant and with a great future.”

Before the second set, guitarist Scott Foster sat by himself on the stage, tuning his instrument. Near him rested a photograph of Jimmy.

“You could see it in his face. You could see the joy,” said Foster, who teaches music at Urban High School and who broke in with Jimmy. “Jimmy always said ‘yes, yes,’ and he made a place for me and was always kind to me.”

Eric Whittington left no doubt as to Jimmy’s role as a Founding Father.

“As an elder, Jimmy nurtured players,” he said. “The way he assembled his band pointed to his desire to bring good musicians into the fold and help them express and extend themselves. He and Chuck Peterson, Don Prell and Scott Foster have all made it clear that they know this is a home to the music and to the musicians, and to the people who love to hear them play.”

Jimmy nurtured more than band mates. With Rory, he left nine children and seven grandchildren.

Together since 2003, she is philosophical about her loss. “Of course, there were more years ahead of us but it was not to be,” she said. “I’m grateful I could spend these final years with him.”

I spent decades teaching high school juniors about Abraham Lincoln and only recently ran across what he’d said sometime between splitting rails in Indiana and speechifying at his Second Inaugural.

“In the end, its not the years in your life that count,” Lincoln opined, “it’s the life in your years.”

“I’ve heard what Lincoln said, but it takes on new meaning for me now,” Rory wrote me. “Jimmy was a man who packed a lot of life and love in his years from his work in prison ministry and at our church, to playing music, to spending time with family and friends, and to educating himself about issues that mattered to him.”

Before he stepped from the stage, after voicing Don Alberts’ ode to Jimmy, Jeff Kaliss summed matters up pretty well, possibly thinking of the Bird & Beckett musicians who’d gone before Jimmy — guitarist Henry Irvin, alto saxophonist Bishop Norman Williams, bass player Ron Crotty and pianist B. J. Papa.

“We need to treasure these people while we have them,” he said.

For her part, Rory Ryan treasured one above all.

“A life well lived, Jimmy Ryan,” the jazz drummer’s wife e-mailed me. “To the very end he did the things he loved, served the God he loved, and lived a life of joy and gratitude.”

Jimmy and Rory Ryan at Bird & Beckett.

Jimmy and Rory Ryan at Bird & Beckett.

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Coexisting with coyotes

2013-09-01

Photo by Janet Kessler, taken in 2013.

By Janet Kessler
San Francisco has several dozen coyotes living in the city, mostly in nuclear families. They’re in all of our major parks. Because most folks in San Francisco have dogs or cats, and because there are pups in some of the parks — pups would be about 4 months old now — it is a good time to brush up on coyote behavior and the guidelines necessary for peacefully coexisting. The information applies in any park where there are coyotes, whether or not there are pups.

Note that Glen Canyon Park has a family of three coyotes right now, as it has for the past several years — the number has not changed, though some of the individuals have.

Coyotes are out most often when it’s dark and when we humans aren’t around. However, most folks now realize that it’s not uncommon to see coyotes out during the day — they are not nocturnal animals. So there is always some potential for dog/coyote encounters and even confrontations, and more so where protective coyote parents are involved. We can be prepared for and prevent these encounters by knowing about coyote behavior and by following simple guidelines. Guidelines generally involve staying vigilant, keeping your pets away from coyotes and knowing how to shoo one away which comes too close.

Coyotes As Neighbors”:  is an all-in-one YouTube video presentation which explains relevant coyote behavior — including their intense family lives and territoriality towards other canines, be they dogs or other coyotes — plus guidelines for keeping us all, humans, pets AND coyotes, safe and worry-free. The video includes two demos on how to effectively shoo off a coyote who has come too close. [Spanish version can be found here. Mandarin version can be found here.

For an additional brief written summary on coyote behavior and how to get along with them, visit Bay Nature’s “How to Get Along With Coyotes As Pups Venture Out”,

Please help get the word out by sharing this information with others. Together we can make San Francisco one of the most coyote-savvy urban areas in the US. All it takes is a little bit of knowledge, but that knowledge is crucial.

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